Classics, passion for the past

1923 Rolls-Royce 20hp Four Door Open Tourer

£ 65000

Body Drophead
Odometer
Fuel type Petrol
Transmission Manual
Exterior Color Black
Interior Color Beige
Upholstery Leather
Steering Rhd
VIN GA26
An extremely correct, authentic-looking re-body, completed about ten years ago to a very high standard. Unlike some ‘replicas’, this car is completely convincing in design, with lovely double curvature panels, correct down to the last detail, both in terms of proportions and period correctness, enhanced by a totally suitable windscreen, a fabulous rear 'Auster' screen, correct headlights and sidelights, all nickel plated, a nice set of instruments, and 23" wheels with straight-sided tyres. The spare wheel is mounted on the rear, but has the option for side-mounting, or the fitting of an extra one. Being finished in black adds to this authenticity, being a pleasant contrast to less appropriate colour schemes sometimes employed. Very smartly finished in all respects, including paintwork, upholstery and high quality, well executed hood with well-proportioned glass rear window, along with a tight-fitting tonneau cover. Aesthetically appealing from any angle, running nicely, driving well and offered serviced, prepared and ready to go. A delightful car.


Chassis No. GA26 Reg. No. ND 3786

Snippets: The Bookie & the Chemist
The first owner of GA26 was Thomas Cook (1857/1957), he trained as a journeyman butcher but in 1900 he established himself as a Commission Agent based in Preston but he later expanded into London. A Commission Agent was an early title for a non-regulated Bookmaker / Turf Accountant. Within 3 years GA26 had been acquired by Alfred Gordon Feinberg Leech of Chorlton-cum-Hardy. There is a well known family with the name Leech associated with this area - cotton mill owners and medical men but it is not known if Alfred was connected to them. Alfred (1887/1977) was a pharmacist & druggist by trade, in 1910 he was approved by the Colonial Pharmacy Board of Cape Town to register his trade within the area. Alfred returned to the UK in the 1920s and in 1925 he took over the business of W H Harrison, chemist & druggist of Wilbraham Rd, Chorlton-cun-Hardy. It was interesting to find out that during WWII Alfred was promoting and selling the drug “Serocalcin” which was advertised as “the scientific way to avoid colds all winter”.